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Tuesday, 16 July 2024 00:00

Peripheral Arterial Disease, PAD, is a condition where the arteries that supply blood to your limbs become narrowed or blocked due to plaque, a buildup of fatty deposits. Due to reduced blood flow, symptoms such as leg pain, cramping, and fatigue may develop, particularly during physical activities like walking. PAD is both an uncomfortable and serious condition, as it can lead to more severe complications, including infections, sores that won't heal, and even an increased risk of amputation, if not treated properly. Early diagnosis and management are essential to improving blood flow, relieving symptoms, and protecting your overall limb health. If you notice these symptoms, it is suggested you meet with a podiatrist to discuss the best plan to improve and maintain your foot health.  

Peripheral artery disease can pose a serious risk to your health. It can increase the risk of stroke and heart attack. If you have symptoms of peripheral artery disease, consult with Dr. Larry Cohen from New York City. Our doctor will assess your condition and provide you with quality foot and ankle treatment.

Peripheral artery disease (PAD) is when arteries are constricted due to plaque (fatty deposits) build-up. This results in less blood flow to the legs and other extremities. The main cause of PAD is atherosclerosis, in which plaque builds up in the arteries.

Symptoms

Symptoms of PAD include:

  • Claudication (leg pain from walking)
  • Numbness in legs
  • Decrease in growth of leg hair and toenails
  • Paleness of the skin
  • Erectile dysfunction
  • Sores and wounds on legs and feet that won’t heal
  • Coldness in one leg

It is important to note that a majority of individuals never show any symptoms of PAD.

Diagnosis

While PAD occurs in the legs and arteries, Podiatrists can diagnose PAD. Podiatrists utilize a test called an ankle-brachial index (ABI). An ABI test compares blood pressure in your arm to you ankle to see if any abnormality occurs. Ultrasound and imaging devices may also be used.

Treatment

Fortunately, lifestyle changes such as maintaining a healthy diet, exercising, managing cholesterol and blood sugar levels, and quitting smoking, can all treat PAD. Medications that prevent clots from occurring can be prescribed. Finally, in some cases, surgery may be recommended.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our office located in Midtown, Manhattan . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

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Friday, 12 July 2024 00:00

Have you noticed a bony protrusion on the side of your big toe? If so, you may have developed the foot condition known as a bunion. Don't let bunions interfere with your daily activities.

Tuesday, 09 July 2024 00:00

Diabetic foot ulcers are open sores or wounds that commonly occur on the feet of individuals with diabetes. They generally result from a combination of neuropathy, poor circulation, and immune system impairment. Neuropathy causes a loss of sensation, leading to unnoticed injuries. Poor circulation hinders healing, while immune dysfunction makes infections more likely. These ulcers can become severe, leading to complications such as infections, gangrene, or even amputations if left untreated. Management of diabetic foot ulcers includes comprehensive wound care, infection control, and addressing underlying conditions. Regular cleaning and debridement to remove dead tissue can promote healing. Antibiotics may be prescribed to combat infection. Additionally, offloading techniques, such as specialized footwear or orthotics, help reduce pressure on the ulcer. Controlling blood sugar levels is imperative to generate healing and prevent recurrence. Regular monitoring and care are essential for effective management. If you have diabetic foot ulcers, it is strongly suggested that you visit a podiatrist for personalized treatment and prevention strategies.

Wound care is an important part in dealing with diabetes. If you have diabetes and a foot wound or would like more information about wound care for diabetics, consult with Dr. Larry Cohen from New York City. Our doctor will assess your condition and provide you with quality foot and ankle treatment.

What Is Wound Care?

Wound care is the practice of taking proper care of a wound. This can range from the smallest to the largest of wounds. While everyone can benefit from proper wound care, it is much more important for diabetics. Diabetics often suffer from poor blood circulation which causes wounds to heal much slower than they would in a non-diabetic. 

What Is the Importance of Wound Care?

While it may not seem apparent with small ulcers on the foot, for diabetics, any size ulcer can become infected. Diabetics often also suffer from neuropathy, or nerve loss. This means they might not even feel when they have an ulcer on their foot. If the wound becomes severely infected, amputation may be necessary. Therefore, it is of the upmost importance to properly care for any and all foot wounds.

How to Care for Wounds

The best way to care for foot wounds is to prevent them. For diabetics, this means daily inspections of the feet for any signs of abnormalities or ulcers. It is also recommended to see a podiatrist several times a year for a foot inspection. If you do have an ulcer, run the wound under water to clear dirt from the wound; then apply antibiotic ointment to the wound and cover with a bandage. Bandages should be changed daily and keeping pressure off the wound is smart. It is advised to see a podiatrist, who can keep an eye on it.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our office located in Midtown, Manhattan . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

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Tuesday, 02 July 2024 00:00

Athlete's foot, medically known as tinea pedis, is a fungal infection that affects the skin on the feet. It is causes itching, burning, and cracked, scaly skin, often occurring between the toes. The infection is caused by dermatophytes, fungi that thrive in warm, moist environments such as locker rooms, showers, and swimming pools. Athlete's foot spreads through direct contact with an infected person or by touching contaminated surfaces. Diagnosis typically involves a physical examination of the affected area by a podiatrist. In some cases, a skin scraping may be taken and examined under a microscope to confirm the presence of the fungus. Proper diagnosis is important to differentiate athlete's foot from other skin conditions. If you have any of the above symptoms, it is suggested that you consult a podiatrist who can effectively treat athlete’s foot, which may include prescribed medication.

Athlete’s Foot

Athlete’s foot is often an uncomfortable condition to experience. Thankfully, podiatrists specialize in treating athlete’s foot and offer the best treatment options. If you have any questions about athlete’s foot, consult with Dr. Larry Cohen from New York City. Our doctor will assess your condition and provide you with quality treatment.

What Is Athlete’s Foot?

Tinea pedis, more commonly known as athlete’s foot, is a non-serious and common fungal infection of the foot. Athlete’s foot is contagious and can be contracted by touching someone who has it or infected surfaces. The most common places contaminated by it are public showers, locker rooms, and swimming pools. Once contracted, it grows on feet that are left inside moist, dark, and warm shoes and socks.

Prevention

The most effective ways to prevent athlete’s foot include:

  • Thoroughly washing and drying feet
  • Avoid going barefoot in locker rooms and public showers
  • Using shower shoes in public showers
  • Wearing socks that allow the feet to breathe
  • Changing socks and shoes frequently if you sweat a lot

Symptoms

Athlete’s foot initially occurs as a rash between the toes. However, if left undiagnosed, it can spread to the sides and bottom of the feet, toenails, and if touched by hand, the hands themselves. Symptoms include:

  • Redness
  • Burning
  • Itching
  • Scaly and peeling skin

Diagnosis and Treatment

Diagnosis is quick and easy. Skin samples will be taken and either viewed under a microscope or sent to a lab for testing. Sometimes, a podiatrist can diagnose it based on simply looking at it. Once confirmed, treatment options include oral and topical antifungal medications.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our office located in Midtown, Manhattan . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

 

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